Monthly Archives: September 2010

Peacemaking Insight #2 – James A. Forbes

A special invitation from Rev. Forbes as he sums up the Congress and how it will play a role in the path of peace:

JamesForbes-PeacemakingInsight

– Pastor Emeritus from the Riverside Church in New York and President and Founder of the Healing of the Nations Foundation James A. Forbes

Correction: the Congress dates are March 1-4, 2011


Peacemaking Insight #1 – Dave Frenchak

At the last meeting of the National Planning Committee we had the chance to talk individually with a few of the wonderful minds gathered around that table.  While these videos offer just a slice of the wisdom and experience being leveled at these meetings towards moving us away from a culture of violence through peacemaking, they pack quite a punch.

Dave Frenchak speaks in this video about the 2011 Congress on Urban Ministry and the tools and equipping that the gathering will provide to those whose ministries will actively create peace.

Dave Frenchak - Peacemaking Insight I

Dave Frenchak - Peacemaking Insight I

“My best hope is that this event is going to be a disruptive event.  That we will be able, through this event, to disrupt the routines in the culture that cause violence… That we will be able to disrupt the roles that different people play in this culture of violence… the roles that we ourselves play, unwittingly, that promotes a culture of violence… And that we will be able to disrupt the rules, both spoken and unspoken, known and unknown, that all of us obey which actually feed the culture of violence.

So that we can begin thinking out of a different framework: not a culture of violence but a culture of making peace.”


Speak Life Spoken Word

Another local opportunity has come to my attention for those of you in the Chicago-land area.  Speak Life will use poetry and prayer to lift up the epidemic of violence in our city.

Speak Life spoken word event


The Art of Peace

Speaking of Faith has a recent podcast up on their website under the title: The Art of Peace.

Speaking of Faith the Art of Peace

John Paul Lederach describes what really happens when people transcend violence while living in it, and so find the moral imagination to live beyond it. Also, stories you’ve never heard in the news — from Colombia, Nepal, Tajikistan, Sierra Leone, Northern Ireland, and Burma.

Access the program at the Speaking of Faith website.


I Care for Peace 5k Walk

What are you walking for on October 2nd?

Why not join the I Care Movement and walk for Peace?

I Care for Peace 5k Walk

The “Do You Care?” campaign was started by 5 interns who worked for the Safety Net Works of Auburn Gresham Youth Council.

The purpose of the “I Care For Peace 5k Walk” is to bring people from all across the city of Chicago together in an effort to raise money to help reduce the high levels of violence in our city.   All of the proceeds from this walk will go towards violence prevention programming for youth.  Specifically, a portion of the proceeds from this walk will go towards creating a Southside Youth Resource Center that is open 24 hours a day for at risk youth.  This resource center will serve youth throughout the city of Chicago, providing them with immediate counseling, gang prevention and intervention services, and other necessary resources.

Did You Know?

  • From January to November 2009, 344 people were murdered in Chicago with guns, which accounted for 82% of the total homicides for the city.
  • From January to November 2009, 213 children and young people ages 0-25 were murdered in Chicago, the majority by guns.
  • Over 210 CPS students, were shot during the 2009 to 2010 academic school year.

Register for the 5k walk.

Join the I Care Movement.

Become a Peacemaker.


Social Justice and Community Development

A partnership between SCUPE and Loyola University
combines Social Justice and Community Development
into one graduate level program (MASJCD).  Susan Rans writes
about how SJ and CD are not unusual bedfellows.

Dr. Mary Nelson' s Restoring Urban Communities Course

Many current and incoming students have asked for a description of the differences between the Social Justice and Community Development tracks of the MASJCD.  In the past, I have answered this question in a kind of shorthand:

Social Justice ‘thinks globally”; Community Development “acts locally”.  Here, I will attempt to put more meat on those bones.

The biggest idea behind the creation of the MASJCD was to join the theoretical and theological study of social justice to a place-based practice and policy approach to change in urban communities.  While the study of social justice leads toward action, the study of community development provides effective and proven tools for action.  So, another formulation might be that the study of social justice reveals why we must act and the study of community development shows what we can do.

It can also be said that community development is a form of social justice.  Our religious traditions speak clearly about the injustices of poverty, of war and of oppression of the powerless.  Answering this call often leads students to involvement in justice issues like eliminating poverty and hunger, ending wars, empowering women or welcoming immigrants.  Community development–building strong and liberating communities in which the economy is available to all, in which every member is a valued contributor, and in which access to health care, education and secure housing is a mandate–fulfills the social justice vision.

Community development also concerns itself with systems—their analysis and the ways in which they must change to become equitable and sustainable.  Understanding housing policy and the details of housing production are essential to changing the housing system.  Knowing the economics and politics of food production is necessary to work to provide local communities with access to healthy food.  As one Chicago community developer often says, “We need to discover ways to make big systems work for small places.”  Studying community development leads to that discovery.

In the end, an argument can be made that significant knowledge of both areas is essential to real and lasting change, and that’s why there is an MASJCD.  And toward that end, we do not require students to declare a track until one full-time semester has passed (one year for part-time students).  And we highly recommend that students take courses in both tracks early in their studies and even after they have chosen a track—a sort of major/minor arrangement.  The best mix of theory and practice, of global issues and local systems will produce to the best agents of social change—the goal of our program.

For more info and discussion of the program, feel free to contact me.

-Susan Rans
MASJCD Graduate Program Director